POP-UP POSITIVITY TOUR Launched With Atlanta’s Super Hip-Pop-Duo BLAZIAN

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LET BLAZIAN BRING SOME POSITIVITY, INSPIRATION, AND FUN TO YOUR SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAM – ALL AGES ARE INVITED TO THE POSITIVE MOVEMENT

The Pop-Up Positivity Tour is a free, one-hour program – for all ages, full of passion, positivity, and fun presented by Atlanta’s hottest new teen Hip-Pop group, Blazian. The tour kicked off June 16, 2017, and will end on August 1, 2017.

Blazian will be taking over summer programs across metro-Atlanta and surrounding areas with a positive message and the tools necessary or youth to engage in powerfully positive activities that will improve their lives and lives of those in their families and communities throughout the summer and upcoming school year.

Using their newly released single, Miyagi as music motivation, each tour stop will be filled with dance, exciting youth engagement, and inspiration!

“We are so excited to spend our summer promoting our new music and inspiring kids to get out there and do some good things for other people,” said the teen brothers.

With the negativity that so many kids face in today’s school environments and online – the Pop-Up Positivity Tour provides a unique opportunity for young people to motivate and challenge OTHER YOUNG PEOPLE to look in the mirror for the positive changes they seek in their lives, their communities, and their cultures.

To Book Blazian for your camp, program or event, please email BookingWeBlazian@gmail.com

For Media Inquiries, contact Kimberly Wilson  at  WishCreativeMedia@gmail.com 

 

ABOUT THE POP-UP POSITIVITY TOUR
This tour was inspired by Blazian’s national news feature on Headline News Network (HLN) – Moment of Sunshine with Robin Meade a few weeks ago, where the teen brothers noticed a young woman walking to a bus stop, wearing shoes that were literally “falling apart”.

They stopped their vehicle to ask her shoe size, and in a span of 15 minutes, they went to the nearest shoe store, bought a pair of shoes and raced back to the bus stop (just in time), as the bus was arriving, and handed her the shoes as she boarded the bus.

It was then, they decided they would be the catalyst to push young people to do “something” – “anything” positive (no matter how big or small) over the summer….and the tour was formed!

ABOUT BLAZIAN
Blazian is an American hip-pop group comprised of brothers, Charlie Walker III (CJ), and Darius Walker (DJ). Natives of Atlanta, GA, these young, gifted entertainers are truly on the rise. They have performed on some of the biggest teen concerts in the country and alongside many of today’s hottest talents. They have recently released their new single and are quickly building a global fan base both on and offline.

Blazian prides themselves on uniting cultures and promoting positivity to the masses. They are a unique gift to today’s saturated industry and with their talent, passion, and energy they will rise above the noise to be leaders of this new generation in entertainment.

Follow Blazian Online Everywhere @WeBlazian

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Blazian at Sparkles June2017

ROD DA GOD – Atlanta’s Hottest New Hip Hop Artist Releases Video for His Debut Single “FairyTale”

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Atlanta GA’s next rising star, 19 yr. old, 6’3, hip hop artist, Jerrod Thompson aka “Rod Da God”, blazes into the industry with a hit record, an authentically fast-building fan base, and the creative talent to propel him into superstardom through music and acting.

Today, he releases the debut video for his 1st single – “Fairytale” which is already in rotation at radio stations across the country and has sparked social media madness as thousands of teenage girls are participating in Rod Da God’s #FairyTaleDayChallenge on Instagram.

With millions of YouTube lyric video views and SoundCloud plays, hundreds of thousands IG and Twitter likes, and an increasing number of radio requests, performances and interviews under his belt – Rod Da God is already creating a solid foundation and industry/fan connection in the crowded “new artist market”.

His music and style are influenced by a wide-range of artists such as Drake, L.L. Cool J, and Will Smith. “I don’t have to try and fit in and look cool, I’m just myself and everyone loves me for it”, says the 6’3 artist and actor (he is also a basketball star, winning the 2016 State Championship at Westlake High School in Atlanta GA).

Fun, young and witty, Rod Da God, has affectionately been crowned the #FreshPrinceofATL, and is hot off the High School “Juice Tour” where young fans crowded the stage, sang along to “Fairytale”, took pictures and got autographs from Atlanta’s hottest new hip hop artist. He now has a full schedule of appearances and performances in Albany GA, Atlanta GA, Macon GA, Nashville TN, Chicago IL, The Carolinas, several Florida markets and more.

Check out Rod Da God’s tour performance – HERE

“Right now, I’m focused on Rod Da God’s movement, we are in the studio creating weekly, this kid is special,” says legendary and Grammy-winning producer DJ Toomp.

Rod Da God’s passion and enduring work ethic have put his career on the fast track. With major plans in development, strategically positioned to follow up and support his fast-moving single, he remains steadfast in expanding his talents, building his fan base and becoming what the industry is missing – authenticity in art…Visit the links below to Meet ROD DA GOD.

All eyes are on this rising star, you can check out the debut video right HERE (Dirty) or HERE (Clean)

Connect with Rod Da God on social media – IG and Twitter @RoddaGoddd

Bonus: Listen to Rod Da God’s next release “Conversation” produced by DJ Toomp HERE

 

For all Media Inquiries:

Contact – Kimberly Jo Wilson at WishCreativeMedia@gmail.com

For Booking and Management:

Contact Sheridan “Hotel” Hardwick PH – 404.454.8443 or Email – LBMG2008@gmail.com 

 

 

 

Survey Finds Brands Struggle to Connect With Gen Z Consumers

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It’s becoming increasingly harder to keep up with Generation Z consumers as they move from store to web to mobile to social and back again with unprecedented agility.

A recent IBM study of 15,000 Gen Z shoppers, titled “Disruptive and Distinctive, Gen Z Shoppers Are Growing Up” found the following:

  • Despite living largely digital lives, 67 percent of Gen Z prefer to shop in a brick-and-mortar store all the time, with another 31 percent preferring to shop in-store sometimes.
  • 66 percent frequently use more than one device and 60 percent will not use an app or website if it is too slow to load.
  • Gen Zers demand highly personalized interactions, value quality over price and want to be engaged with the brand across all channels.

The study found that the cohort represents $44 billion in estimated buying power.

“Despite their young ages, members of Generation Z already hold unprecedented influence over family purchasing decisions and wield enormous economic power, ” reported IBM. “Retail and consumer products brands must engage the upcoming Gen Zers now to prosper tomorrow.”

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In a separate customer experience study of more than 500 brands in 24 countries, IBM found that businesses are struggling to deliver on the expectations of consumers:

  • Only 19 percent of retailers can provide a highly personalized digital shopping experience
  • Only 17 percent can provide more than in stock/out of stock information.
  • 84 percent did not offer any in-store mobile services.

“In this new era of customer engagement, what will separate the winners from everyone else is a differentiated brand experience that delivers high impact engagements with compelling personalization regardless of where the customer is,” said Harriet Green, GM IBM Watson Customer Engagement, in a press release. “With Watson Cognitive Engagement solutions, IBM is working with retailers across globe to make these experiences a reality for millions of consumers.”

IBM Watson Customer Engagement is helping leading retailers such as HSN, 1-800-FLOWERS.com and Ermes drive enduring brand loyalty with all generations of customers.

A growing force, Gen Z consumers number about 2 billion globally today, according to a new study from Kantar Millward Brown. “AdReaction: Engaging Gen X, Y and Z,” the first comprehensive global study of Gen Z, found that “36% of Gen Z globally access Instagram several times a day and 24% access Snapchat at the same frequency, compared to 21% and 10% respectively for Gen Y (those aged 20-34) and 9% and 4% for Gen X (those aged 35-49).”

“Gen Z have grown up in an on-demand world of infinite choice, and this flavours their expectations of advertising,” said Duncan Southgate, global brand director at Kantar Millward Brown. “They are much more attracted to ads that allow them to co-create or shape what happens, compared to Gens Y and X, who have a higher preference to link to more information about the brand.”

We are sure the Teen B.E.A.T. Summit will become the bridge from brand to Gen Z consumer….Spring Break 2017, Atlanta GA.

The 2017 Teen B.E.A.T. Summit Is On The Way…April 3-9, 2017 Atlanta GA

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The B.E.A.T. Summit will bring together the most creative young songwriters, performing artists, visual artists,future executives, djs, and music producers…for seven (7) days of captivating workshops, engaging experiences, provocative panel discussions, artist showcases, hands-on-training, daily business luncheons, celebrity appearances, new product demonstrations – a full range of exciting events!

Visit www.TeenBEATSummit.com and sign up for updates, early registration announcements, special give-a-ways, and passes for exclusive pre-B.E.A.T. Summit events.

Email us at TheTeenBEATSummit@gmail.com for sponsorship opportunities, group registrations, volunteer sign up, and media requests.

Client News: ZUCOT GALLERY ANNOUNCES ‘DEAR SUMMER….’ ARTIST TALK

 

ZucotGallery

***For Immediate Release***

The Largest African-American Art Gallery in the Southeast Hosts the “Dear Summer…’ Artist Talk Featuring Several of the Most Exciting Talents Currently in the Art Community – August 13, 2016 in Atlanta GA

(Atlanta GA – August 9, 2016) Atlanta-based ZuCot Gallery is owned and operated by the Art Brothers (Troy Taylor, Onaje Henderson, and Omari Henderson) and specializes in promoting original pieces of art by living African-American artists.

On Saturday, August 13, 2016, the gallery will host the Dear Summer…’ Artist Talk, an opportunity to listen to and speak with the artists about their body of work on display. They will share their personal journeys of how and why they created their art pieces featured in the ‘Dear Summer…’ Exhibit.

The Artist Talk will take place at ZuCot’s artistically modern downtown Atlanta location, 100 Centennial Olympic Park Dr., Atlanta GA 30313 from 1pm – 3pm.

The ‘Dear Summer…’ exhibition successfully opened on July 22, 2016 with several pieces sold and over 250 guests in attendance, it will close on September 10th, 2016, giving art enthusiasts, art collectors and art supporters a chance to be inspired and influenced by these talented artists.

Dear Summer…’  features several of the most exciting talents currently in the art community.  William Rhodes tackles what is lost and the hope that is held onto in time’s passing. Julio Meja taps into the vague emotions that are imbued in nostalgia. Kimmy Cantrell connects more literally with ceramic pieces cured in the intense heat of the season. Charly Palmer observes the shadowy elements of summer, and artist Jamaal Barder works through current events and the love that will ultimately persist.

#BlackArtMatters

To view these artists, as well as, works from previous exhibitions, visit the ZuCot Gallery website. Stay up-to-date with ZuCot Gallery happenings @ZucotGallery (Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest).

For more information, media access and/or interview requests, please contact Kimberly Wilson (Wish Creative Media & Marketing) at404.484.5538 or via email at WishCreativeMedia@gmail.com

Why Is It So Hard To Get Paid In the Music Industry?

Guest Post: Why Getting Paid In The Music Industry Is So Complicated, And How It Can Be Better

Guest Post: Why Getting Paid In The Music Industry Is So Complicated, And How It Can Be Better

 

David Balto is a lawyer and consumer advocate based in Washington, D.C., who previously served as the policy director of the Federal Trade Commission.

In Recording Academy CEO Neil Portnow’s recent op-ed called The Penny Paradox, he asked, “Isn’t a song worth more than a penny?” The problem, as outlined by Portnow, is that artists aren’t being paid enough for their work. However, this is a gross oversimplification of a more complicated issue of payment in the music industry. An issue that, unfortunately, consumers (and artists) are caught in the middle of as powerful and less powerful interests fight over how to divide payments amongst themselves.

When Portnow is talking about a song being worth a penny he is, of course, not talking about someone being able to own a song for an actual penny. He is talking about the cost per listen of a single license. An interactive music streamer like Spotify needs two licenses to serve a single song to a customer, and three licenses under certain circumstances. When a consumer buys a song, they make one payment and own it forever. Streaming a song is not ownership, and royalties must be paid for each listen.

This leads to a complex picture of how artists earn money. They can get one payment from a fan that buys their album or a recurring payment as a fan continues to play their songs on a streaming service. Artists can also get paid both ways from a single fan — a correlation between internet radio “spins” and sales were found in 2014.

It gets even more complicated. Artists own different copyrights and get paid differently based on whether they wrote the song and/or recorded the song. They deal with different middlemen and the licensing is handled through different organizations: SoundExchange for sound recording rights, a publishing rights organization like ASCAP or BMI for the performance right and individual publishers for each song’s mechanical rights.

ASCAP and BMI are currently regulated through agreements made with the Department of Justice that are regulated by federal courts which stress fairness and transparency. These agreements were necessary because collective bargaining — like that done through ASCAP and BMI — is illegal under antitrust laws, but all parties considered it necessary to have a collective bargaining system to cut down contracting costs in a complex industry. In other words, it’s a narrow exception to the general rules of a competitive market.

And now it’s getting even more complicated. Publishers, some of which have market power, are lobbying the DOJ to make changes in the consent decrees to allow them to withhold music from radio, venues and streaming services. These changes would let publishers jump out of ASCAP and BMI when it suits them. So much for fairness and non-discrimination. And so much for fair prices for consumers.

Publishers will also be able to agree amongst themselves not to license a performance right unless all owners of a copyright assent. This will give even small owners of a copyright complete control, not just over performance rights but over the sound recording as well. If a five percent owner of the performance rights to Justin Bieber’s “Love Yourself” refuses to license, for instance, that not only affects other owners of the performance rights, but also Justin Bieber’s royalty payments for the sound recording. A music user has to license all rights to play a song, and if any fractional owner had veto rights they would be able to control the destiny of the entire song and every sound recording, not just what they own.

This didn’t matter when radio and venues could contract with ASCAP and BMI, each of which has to license to all comers at a fair rate. But in a world where publishers can be in and out of ASCAP and BMI, it suddenly matters a great deal. This has the potential to not only hurt consumers, but also artists who can’t get their song played because an owner of a small piece of it refuses to license. Ultimately, both consumers and artists will lose.

I do not agree with Portnow on the simple solution that payments for songs need to increase. This is the solution before the DOJ right now, and it will likely lead to tremendous harm to consumers and potentially artists (we don’t know how much of that increase, if any, will filter through to them and how much will be pocketed by the powerful publishers). However, I do agree that we can do better and that solutions must come from Congress.

Congress, for example, could set up a one-stop shop for the complete bundle of rights needed to play a song, and all the rights owners could divide those payments among themselves. This would make it easy to agree on a payment that is good for artists while still allowing streaming services to be profitable (important after the Copyright Royalty Board’s rate increase led to the closure of many smaller independent and local services). Congress also has many more options to make sure the most vulnerable parties, consumers, and artists, are protected.

Article Via Billboard.Biz

 

Why Some Record Labels Fail, While Others Succeed?

What I Learned Working with a Label That Failed

 

In early 2015, I was invited to join a “dream team” of music industry professionals.

This team consisted of a former VP of a major record label, a manager from a “major” indie artist, as well as an assembly of top-notch graphic designers, publicists and assistants. Our mission was to work with a brand new record label and assist them in acquiring a larger fanbase and overall develop their brand.

From the surface we succeeded: Social media numbers skyrocketed, we garnered healthy press coverage, and we even had two of their artist chart on radio. Not to mention, we had some official showcases, as well some fun opening spots.

However, despite this, the label ended up folding. Some of their (very talented) roster still operates with them, but what I assume is just until their contracts expire, or they recoup their recording costs.

So, how did this happen? They had the talent, a good team, and not to mention the capital, so… what happened? And more importantly, what can artists, labels and managers learn from this?

 

Baby Steps

The New Artists Were Treated Like Vets.

Their artists were talented, very talented. One issue I found was that the label wanted myself and my team to completely take over the artist’s social media channels. However, they weren’t ready developmentally for a team to just completely take over their brand and social media.

Come to think of it, even my major artist clients don’t have a team handling their social completely. You might have someone schedule certain portions of content or maybe offer an extra set of hands during a tour, but for the most part, as an artist, you need to showcase your brand online.

Especially when that brand is still being developed.

This led to the artists feeling as if the label wasn’t “portraying their brand” appropriately online. They felt as if tweets went out in a tone that wasn’t “their voice”. And well, yeah — because it wasn’t their voice. Their brand was still too green for someone else to handle it.

These guys were still finding their voice as an artist, so they needed to tweet, do videos and interact on their own. Because they were still growing.

In today’s digital era, your online footprint — your imagery, your tweets, your ‘gram posts — are just as important as your music. You can have a dope track that’s getting radio play, but if your fans aren’t sharing it online, then it’s going to just fizzle out. You can have a team help you out with this, I recommend it, but handing it off completely to a third party — is a bit dangerous.

But social media really wasn’t the problem…

We did well on social media. The pages grew, and we got some great online traction during releases. However, when an artist doesn’t feel as if they have control of their art — the energy stops. You don’t need this, especially from a young artist. I already spoke on how the artist is the CEO, even with a label. You certainly don’t want “too many chefs in the kitchen” spoiling this. You need to give your artist’s room to grow.

However, let’s also talk about this from a growth standpoint. One of the guys on the “consultant team” was an industry vet of 30+ years or so. He’s also the manager of an artist that’s been the indie king, before indie was practical. He’d often gruff that our artists haven’t “paid their dues” yet.

And while that may seem like something any vet would say to a rookie — it’s actually a valuable piece of insight.

By putting a new artist on a pedestal, you’re selling the artist a lifestyle that might not actually come into fruition. The artist needs to be spending time networking, and remaining active on social media — rather than thinking: “The team will handle it”.

This is a major way to set an artist up for failure — by giving them illusions that they’re on the road to success, when their brand still hasn’t matured.

This was ridiculously summarized one week when we were on the road. The artists went out to a few clubs the night before a key performance. The label’s “A&R” pushed them to go, labeling it as “networking”. But in reality, it was just an excuse for them to stay out all night. Did they network? Maybe. But I do know that the only thing to come from their “network outing” was two artists oversleeping, with hoarse voices the day of their major showcase.

Another quick observation was the naivety that a track was going to go viral on it’s own — or the fact that we’d have thousands of pre-orders for these relatively known artists.  Sure, the artist is good — and might be popping in your backyard, but we have to ensure that we have a working platform before we can expect to see massive results and brand awareness.

 

Wheels.

We Confused Movement with Progress

I want to be very clear about the dynamic of this partnership, and the dynamic of any client-agency relationship. It’s your duty to tell your client what their doing a bad idea. In this circumstance, the CEO of the label hired us because he was rather green when it came to the music industry.

However, the CEO would often go against our advice, a lot of this centered around pay-for-play.

The CEO wanted to ensure the artists saw movement, he wanted his artists satisfied because they were playing “during” SXSW, they were being posted on blogs, or they were opening for acts. While this is true, you need to keep your artists happy with movement, that movement isn’t always progress.

We bought onto gigs, which was a great experience for the artist — but didn’t really result in new fans or even moved merch. Especially when the line-up was jam packed with other folks who paid to play.

We paid to get onto blogs, which the artist thought was cool, but at the end of the day,they were mid-tier and some top blogs, who rarely even shared the article on their social outlets. It was found on the website sure — but it wasn’t on the main page, or on their social media. So, who saw it? Aside from the fans we shared it with.

And yes, we boosted on social and more, but the key to PR is to make connections with journalists, not pay to be on a blog that isn’t even promoting their own article.

Similarly, why spend money on paying for shows, when you could be spending time pitching talent buyers and building relationships with venues. Or even spending time genuinely connecting with other bands, so those other artists invite you on as an open act. Organically. Without paying a dime.

One thing we did well was radio. Our guys were great on the microphone, and we had them on the road, going to stations spinning their work to do interviews. This led to more airplay, and it even led to a few music festival opportunities. Did it cost money to send them across the country doing press? Yes. But did it result in more authentic reach? Yep.

Our radio campaign was a great example of using leverage, to further a message. While, all of the paid work, was us moving without progression.

I guess I should also note that we likely relied too heavily on a radio promoter. After some time, we should have stopped outsourcing it, and brought the radio promotion in-house. Since we were already making connections, and we already sunk a pretty penny into the artists radio campaigns. This could have simply been us paying too much for a promoter, rather than a bad marketing move.

Watching a promising label sink a lot of money into pay-for-play, and pay-for-post opportunities, to the point that they were hurting financially, is why I’m such a vocal component of authentic PR and booking strategies.

However, we wanted to move. The wheels were spinning, but we weren’t really going anywhere.

The key here is leverage.

If you get a blog post, that blog post better be posted on the outlet’s social media, and be a genuine write-up, not just a copy and paste.

If you open up for an artist, there needs to be good marketing via the venue, and you need to ensure you’ll have a chance to connect with fans and move merch.

Sure, you can move, but you have to grow and progress as well. Simple movement isn’t enough, you need to go somewhere. Not just turn your wheels.

In this case, the CEO was paying big money to move our wheels — which later led to the label’s demise.

Cookie Cutter

We Tried Using a Cookie Cutter Approach

The label had four prominent artists: One was an R&B act, two were rappers , and lastly, the label had an indie rock group, to round things out.

While the label kept pushing to use one marketing approach for all artists, you simply cannot use a “copy/paste” view when looking at these three artists. For instance, one could think you can lump the R&B artists and two rappers into one category, however, not so much.

The R&B artist was young and still really appealed to the 13-17 year old demographic. Whereas the two rappers had lyrical content that mainly dealt with sex, drugs and partying.

But even the two rappers were incredibly different — one was more of a lyricist, who had a very “mainstream” vibe to him. While the other had more of a rough image, a focus on production and had lyrical content that was a bit more “in your face” than the other rapper.

Despite having these very different artists, the label insisted they be booked at the same showcases, which, weren’t too bad. Until you remember, oh damn, they had an indie rock band, too!

Yes, the indie rock group was scheduled to play at a hip hop showcase in Austin, Texas.

That’s the thing, the team had in-depth experience surrounding hip hop, and the indie rock group suffered from it. The  group was also incredibly talented, and actually had the most fan interaction on the label. They also (since there was 4 of them) seemed to take a lot of marketing initiative on their own.

The booking issue also came to a head when they were trying to book the rapper, who had a radio single explicit about sex, to play a high school tour. Because it worked for the R&B singer. Luckily, we convinced them to not go that route.

But the differences are more nuanced than just booking decisions. For instance, even if the two rappers were both “hip hop artists” things such as radio stations, press outlets, and even advertising keywords were going to change.

 

Contracts

The Artists Needed Development, Not Contracts.

I’m not a legal expert, and I tend to refer my clients to folks that know more about contracts than I do. However, I do know that an artist shouldn’t have to be held to ridiculously high recoup costs, when there isn’t really a platform yet.

The label seemed to have these artists under agreements that some may consider standard industry fare. However, the label was brand new!

The label/artist relationship is symbiotic. For the artist to make money, the artist has to recoup the money that the label invested. So if the label spends 15K on recording, then the artist won’t see any money until they recoup that 15K. That’s on both of the label and artist to work towards.

However, the label wasn’t at a place in which they had a system to make money, similarly, the artists weren’t at a place where they had popping fan bases who were willing to consistently buy an artist’s product. Sure, this seems a bit a Chicken-Egg situation, however, these artists didn’t need record label – bank loans, they needed to be taught how to carry themselves as artists. And instead of the label depending on the artists to really bring in revenue (miraculously), they needed to spend more time developing their booking, licensing and sales systems before signing various artists.

My team didn’t deal with the artist’s contracts, and more tried to get the label to a place in which they were profiting. However, this showed a naivety that exists in a lot of young labels. Folks think “if they build it, it’ll come” but… no, you have to build it well. You need a solid foundation and solid revenue strategy before signing on multiple artists.

As consultants, as labels, as managers, as publicists — we forget this simple fact that bares repeating:

We are assisting artists in promoting their creation. We are helping an artist bring light to their art.

There’s nothing sexy or cool about this — actually, it’s a lot of pressure. You’re ensuring that you are framing, protecting and promoting an artist’s vision. That’s heavy. Before you delve into any artist relationship, you need to ensure you are properly equipped to give them the spotlight that they deserve.

 

Concluding This.

The above four “reasons” were integral in this label failing, but at the end of the day — the major reason we failed was capital. If we were to have taken our time between each artist, we might still be trucking along on this. But we spent a lot of money turning wheels, and promoting our acts very quickly and rapidly.

Also, there was just a lot of foundational issues that still needed to be addressed and repaired. Those restorations could’ve taken quite some time.

But at the end of the day, despite the label folding, this was one of the most memorable projects I have had the privilege of working on. The “dream team” of consultants have gone on to do many successful and fun projects, and the guys at the label I still have an incredible amount of respect for. Not to mention these artists are still incredible musicians, and I’m sure they’ll find ways to succeed and prosper very soon.

 

Thanks @wtylerallen for this insight…..

As a music marketing strategist, Tyler Allen works with an extensive array of artists, labels, music tech, and music retail entities. Tyler began his music industry career with Sony Music Entertainment and RED Distribution, as well as the advertising industry. He is dedicated to giving veteran artists the tools to preserve their legacy, and new artists the tools to begin theirs (as well as everything in between). Learn more at wtylerconsulting.com.