How ATL Took Over New York As THE Modern Hip Hop Music Mecca…

Atlanta has become the mecca of hip-hop because it has built an infrastructure where each generation helps the next crop of artists “get on.” While New York hip-hop has no such farm system due to years of infighting.

There’s supporting your friend’s dreams, then there’s what Atlanta rapper Young Thug did for his fellow ATLien Lil Baby. Last week, Lil Baby told XXL that Thug wanted him to focus on rap so bad that he literally paid him to stay out of the streets and get in the studio. “Young Thug, he gave me all the jewels…He said ‘Bruh you can rap, you got it. You could be next.’”

It turns out Thug was right. Lil Baby is one of the most in-demand artists in Atlanta off the strength of his Harder Than Ever album and Drip Harder collaboration with Gunna. What’s more fascinating about Thug’s charity is the fact that Lil Baby didn’t even sign to Thug’s YSL Records. He signed to industry behemoth Quality Control. Thug didn’t profit off of Baby’s come up. But he’s just paying forward the good treatment he received from Gucci Mane, his mentor figure who gave him a $25K advance to sign with 1017 Brick Squad without hearing a song. It’s also worth noting that upon Gucci Mane’s 2014 incarceration on gun charges, he sold Thug’s contract to 300 Records, saying “I didn’t want nobody to take advantage of him. I wanted him to be his own boss. ”

Gucci and Thug’s good deeds weren’t about turning a profit, it was about seeing the next person shine. That communal mindset is part of why Atlanta is the new mecca of hip-hop. Despite their share of internal conflict, they embody the immortal words of Paid In Full’s Ace: “everybody eats, B.” If only New York’s hip-hop scene had the same mindset since the turn of the century. They more accurately reflect an observation from Paid In Full’s Rico, who noted “half these niggas wanna be the man just because.”

While Atlanta hip-hop has built an infrastructure where each generation helps the next crop of artists “get on” with weighty features and gestures like Thug’s, New York hip-hop has no such farm system due to years of infighting. While the whole Apple was grappling to be King Of New York, Atlanta simply resolved to be royalty together.

Last week was the 10-year anniversary of his ThisIs50 fest, where 50 Cent threw an olive branch to several artists he and his G-Unit crew had been beefing with throughout the 2000s, including the Lox and Joe Budden’s Slaughterhouse. At the time, 50 said “they say New York City, we don’t actually get along, that’s not true. We could work together and get more money than we can get apart.” Fabolous tweeted in response that, “it’s interesting to see 50 Cent unite with NY artists when he’s one of the reasons NY hip hop became so isolated & crumbled…Do u agree NY?”

50 called Fabolous’ comments “disappointing,” but he didn’t issue much of a counterpoint. It’s hard to disagree with his assertion if one connects the dots. Rapper IDK called 50 Cent a “superhero” to his generation, but the G-Unit general wasn’t using his power for good. 50’s gripe with Ja Rule and Murder Inc. had him throwing lyrical darts at anyone who collaborated with Ja. His indignation with Fat Joe and Jadakiss’ appearance on Ja Rule’s “New York,” and Havoc’s appearance in the video, caused him to throw shots at all three artists on “Piggy Bank.”

The drama went deeper when, in the midst of antagonizing Styles P by proclaiming he could “stop a record” at Koch Records, he ended up getting into it with Cam’ron on Hot 97. 50 Cent then essentially split Dipset in two by having Jim Jones and Juelz Santana perform onstage with him right after he and Cam’ron traded disses. As Dipset member Un Kasa recently recalled, the chess move spelled the end of Dipset as we knew it. Of course, 50 ended up squashing his issues with all of those crews, but it was too little too late.

That said, New York’s fracture isn’t all 50 Cent’s fault. The tension that he perpetuated wasn’t new to the city. New York rap, more than any other region, is predicated on a concept of lyrical supremacy that’s ripe to breeding a culture of hostility. As Nas proclaimed on “The Message,” “there can only be one king.” And artists’ fight for King of New York status often devolved from healthy competition to real-life discord. The ’80s had the Juice Crew vs. Boogie Down Productions and Kool Moe Dee sparring against LL Cool J. In the ’90s, certain members of the Wu-Tang Clan had strife with The Notorious B.I.G. over whose mafioso-stylings were superior. Nas and Biggie were on a collision course before Biggie’s untimely death. Who knows how much acrimony they could have bred had the lyrical sparring continued. JAY-Z and Nas’ subsequent fight for the crown seemed inevitable in the wake of Biggie’s death.

But Atlanta has never been on that program. It was during Atlanta’s mid-2000s rise that Young Jeezy and other southern rappers rankled traditionalists by declaring that they’re “not a rapper” at all. New York’s greatest MCs have hoards of battle rhymes referencing them being the best, but you’d be hard-pressed to find similar in the Atlanta rap canon. Their passion for the craft and sense of competition doesn’t manifest in the same way that it has in New York because the thematic priorities are so different. It’s why the city’s biggest rappers can not only coexist but put on the next artist with no qualms about their own light being dimmed.

That said, the city’s rap scene hasn’t been 100% harmonious. There have been numerous beefs, including Gucci Mane and Jeezy; Gucci Mane and Waka Flocka; TI and Shawty Lo; TI and Ludacris; and Future and Rocko. Some form of conflict is natural within any large collective. But what’s impressive about the Atlanta scene is that (for the most part) they’ve been able to either squash their conflicts or allow them to fester without fracturing the entire scene.

Perhaps they know the cost of sowing discord in the city’s tight-knit scene. As 2 Chainz noted on Everyday Struggle, the city is small, and “everybody got a Draco.” Gucci Mane and Jeezy’s beef, which culminated in Gucci Mane fatally shooting Young Jeezy’s artist in self-defense, is an example of how far beef can go. And it seems like, consciously or not, artists have resolved to never let things go there again. Most are in a different space in life, as evidenced by Gucci Mane and Jeezy being able to be in the same spaces multiple times in the past decade, including a Beyonce show in 2016.

There’s simply too much money to be made in Atlanta, and too many young artists like Lil Baby, Gunna, inspiring both the previous and next generation to further their career. Only recently has New York adopted similar energy, with contemporary mainstream acts like A$AP Mob, High Bridge, Casanova, Young MA, Dave East and others working with each other. Hopefully, they can take cues from Atlanta, who have operated with a model as similar to socialism as there will likely ever be in hip-hop. Eventually, it will be Lil Baby’s turn to reach out to the young artists under him who “got it” and lengthen his city’s unprecedented run. If recent history is any indication, that won’t be a problem for him.

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Story Via Andre Gee (Okay Player)

Andre Gee is a New York-based freelance writer with work at Uproxx Music, Impose Magazine, and Cypher League. Feel free to follow his obvious Twitter musings that seemed brilliant at the moment @andrejgee.

ROD DA GOD – Atlanta’s Hottest New Hip Hop Artist Releases Video for His Debut Single “FairyTale”

FairyTale Promo Pic

Atlanta GA’s next rising star, 19 yr. old, 6’3, hip hop artist, Jerrod Thompson aka “Rod Da God”, blazes into the industry with a hit record, an authentically fast-building fan base, and the creative talent to propel him into superstardom through music and acting.

Today, he releases the debut video for his 1st single – “Fairytale” which is already in rotation at radio stations across the country and has sparked social media madness as thousands of teenage girls are participating in Rod Da God’s #FairyTaleDayChallenge on Instagram.

With millions of YouTube lyric video views and SoundCloud plays, hundreds of thousands IG and Twitter likes, and an increasing number of radio requests, performances and interviews under his belt – Rod Da God is already creating a solid foundation and industry/fan connection in the crowded “new artist market”.

His music and style are influenced by a wide-range of artists such as Drake, L.L. Cool J, and Will Smith. “I don’t have to try and fit in and look cool, I’m just myself and everyone loves me for it”, says the 6’3 artist and actor (he is also a basketball star, winning the 2016 State Championship at Westlake High School in Atlanta GA).

Fun, young and witty, Rod Da God, has affectionately been crowned the #FreshPrinceofATL, and is hot off the High School “Juice Tour” where young fans crowded the stage, sang along to “Fairytale”, took pictures and got autographs from Atlanta’s hottest new hip hop artist. He now has a full schedule of appearances and performances in Albany GA, Atlanta GA, Macon GA, Nashville TN, Chicago IL, The Carolinas, several Florida markets and more.

Check out Rod Da God’s tour performance – HERE

“Right now, I’m focused on Rod Da God’s movement, we are in the studio creating weekly, this kid is special,” says legendary and Grammy-winning producer DJ Toomp.

Rod Da God’s passion and enduring work ethic have put his career on the fast track. With major plans in development, strategically positioned to follow up and support his fast-moving single, he remains steadfast in expanding his talents, building his fan base and becoming what the industry is missing – authenticity in art…Visit the links below to Meet ROD DA GOD.

All eyes are on this rising star, you can check out the debut video right HERE (Dirty) or HERE (Clean)

Connect with Rod Da God on social media – IG and Twitter @RoddaGoddd

Bonus: Listen to Rod Da God’s next release “Conversation” produced by DJ Toomp HERE

 

For all Media Inquiries:

Contact – Kimberly Jo Wilson at WishCreativeMedia@gmail.com

For Booking and Management:

Contact Sheridan “Hotel” Hardwick PH – 404.454.8443 or Email – LBMG2008@gmail.com 

 

 

 

Why Is It So Hard To Get Paid In the Music Industry?

Guest Post: Why Getting Paid In The Music Industry Is So Complicated, And How It Can Be Better

Guest Post: Why Getting Paid In The Music Industry Is So Complicated, And How It Can Be Better

 

David Balto is a lawyer and consumer advocate based in Washington, D.C., who previously served as the policy director of the Federal Trade Commission.

In Recording Academy CEO Neil Portnow’s recent op-ed called The Penny Paradox, he asked, “Isn’t a song worth more than a penny?” The problem, as outlined by Portnow, is that artists aren’t being paid enough for their work. However, this is a gross oversimplification of a more complicated issue of payment in the music industry. An issue that, unfortunately, consumers (and artists) are caught in the middle of as powerful and less powerful interests fight over how to divide payments amongst themselves.

When Portnow is talking about a song being worth a penny he is, of course, not talking about someone being able to own a song for an actual penny. He is talking about the cost per listen of a single license. An interactive music streamer like Spotify needs two licenses to serve a single song to a customer, and three licenses under certain circumstances. When a consumer buys a song, they make one payment and own it forever. Streaming a song is not ownership, and royalties must be paid for each listen.

This leads to a complex picture of how artists earn money. They can get one payment from a fan that buys their album or a recurring payment as a fan continues to play their songs on a streaming service. Artists can also get paid both ways from a single fan — a correlation between internet radio “spins” and sales were found in 2014.

It gets even more complicated. Artists own different copyrights and get paid differently based on whether they wrote the song and/or recorded the song. They deal with different middlemen and the licensing is handled through different organizations: SoundExchange for sound recording rights, a publishing rights organization like ASCAP or BMI for the performance right and individual publishers for each song’s mechanical rights.

ASCAP and BMI are currently regulated through agreements made with the Department of Justice that are regulated by federal courts which stress fairness and transparency. These agreements were necessary because collective bargaining — like that done through ASCAP and BMI — is illegal under antitrust laws, but all parties considered it necessary to have a collective bargaining system to cut down contracting costs in a complex industry. In other words, it’s a narrow exception to the general rules of a competitive market.

And now it’s getting even more complicated. Publishers, some of which have market power, are lobbying the DOJ to make changes in the consent decrees to allow them to withhold music from radio, venues and streaming services. These changes would let publishers jump out of ASCAP and BMI when it suits them. So much for fairness and non-discrimination. And so much for fair prices for consumers.

Publishers will also be able to agree amongst themselves not to license a performance right unless all owners of a copyright assent. This will give even small owners of a copyright complete control, not just over performance rights but over the sound recording as well. If a five percent owner of the performance rights to Justin Bieber’s “Love Yourself” refuses to license, for instance, that not only affects other owners of the performance rights, but also Justin Bieber’s royalty payments for the sound recording. A music user has to license all rights to play a song, and if any fractional owner had veto rights they would be able to control the destiny of the entire song and every sound recording, not just what they own.

This didn’t matter when radio and venues could contract with ASCAP and BMI, each of which has to license to all comers at a fair rate. But in a world where publishers can be in and out of ASCAP and BMI, it suddenly matters a great deal. This has the potential to not only hurt consumers, but also artists who can’t get their song played because an owner of a small piece of it refuses to license. Ultimately, both consumers and artists will lose.

I do not agree with Portnow on the simple solution that payments for songs need to increase. This is the solution before the DOJ right now, and it will likely lead to tremendous harm to consumers and potentially artists (we don’t know how much of that increase, if any, will filter through to them and how much will be pocketed by the powerful publishers). However, I do agree that we can do better and that solutions must come from Congress.

Congress, for example, could set up a one-stop shop for the complete bundle of rights needed to play a song, and all the rights owners could divide those payments among themselves. This would make it easy to agree on a payment that is good for artists while still allowing streaming services to be profitable (important after the Copyright Royalty Board’s rate increase led to the closure of many smaller independent and local services). Congress also has many more options to make sure the most vulnerable parties, consumers, and artists, are protected.

Article Via Billboard.Biz

 

A NEW STAR EMERGES….

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LEXXI BANX

Eagerly entering the music scene with her melodious tone, animated cut throat lyrics and often with her violin in tow…Lexxi is in a class by herself!

Singer, Rapper, Classical Violinist, Dancer, & Actress… Lexxi Banx knows what it means to work with dedication, determination, and discipline. Those who know her define her as an overcomer and survivor. Beginning at age eight when she picked up her first violin, then age ten when she wrote her first lyrics and at 16 composed her first score  – this child prodigy has been striking beautiful chords, vocalizing unforgettable melodies, and perfecting her freestyle rap skills every since….

Originally from Spartanburg, South Carolina, Lexxi Banx is a unique quadruple threat in the entertainment industry…and her talents will soon reach way beyond her current home base of Atlanta GA.

For Your Hip Hop, EDM and R&B Listening Pleasure…

Welcome to Lexxi’s World!

[Client News: Legalize Loud – Recap]

Event Pics: #LegalizeLoud Concert w/ Stalley Hosted By Lady B, Fort Knox and Cory B

by whycauseican on June 11, 2013

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Last Tuesday, Legalized Loud brought the city of Atlanta out to the Masquerade for their concert which headlined MMG’s own Stalley. Special guest who came out to the event to salute the artist in Atlanta was DJ Scream, Big K.R.I.T., Scotty and more! The event was hosted by CYHMB.com’s Lady B, 107.9′s Cory B and the Livest host alive Fort Knox with DJ Mister Smith on the 1′s and 2′s. Opening performances consisted of Translee, Zip Kennedy, Band Geakz, New Fad Zoo, Marian Mereba, Willie Hyn, Stuey Rock and more!

Click Here For All The Pics From The Event

Shouts Out to My Friends At Why Cause I Can!  Appreciate the Support…See You Next Month at Legalize Loud July ’13 Edition!

[Client News] Legalize Loud with Stalley

Tuesday, June 4th the 2nd Installment of the Legalize Loud Series Kicks Off with Maybach Music Member, Stalley, along with ATL’s Own Scotty ATL, Forte Bowie,Translee, Stuey Rock and many more!

Please contact Wish Creative for Media Access!

 
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