POP-UP POSITIVITY TOUR Launched With Atlanta’s Super Hip-Pop-Duo BLAZIAN

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LET BLAZIAN BRING SOME POSITIVITY, INSPIRATION, AND FUN TO YOUR SUMMER YOUTH PROGRAM – ALL AGES ARE INVITED TO THE POSITIVE MOVEMENT

The Pop-Up Positivity Tour is a free, one-hour program – for all ages, full of passion, positivity, and fun presented by Atlanta’s hottest new teen Hip-Pop group, Blazian. The tour kicked off June 16, 2017, and will end on August 1, 2017.

Blazian will be taking over summer programs across metro-Atlanta and surrounding areas with a positive message and the tools necessary or youth to engage in powerfully positive activities that will improve their lives and lives of those in their families and communities throughout the summer and upcoming school year.

Using their newly released single, Miyagi as music motivation, each tour stop will be filled with dance, exciting youth engagement, and inspiration!

“We are so excited to spend our summer promoting our new music and inspiring kids to get out there and do some good things for other people,” said the teen brothers.

With the negativity that so many kids face in today’s school environments and online – the Pop-Up Positivity Tour provides a unique opportunity for young people to motivate and challenge OTHER YOUNG PEOPLE to look in the mirror for the positive changes they seek in their lives, their communities, and their cultures.

To Book Blazian for your camp, program or event, please email BookingWeBlazian@gmail.com

For Media Inquiries, contact Kimberly Wilson  at  WishCreativeMedia@gmail.com 

 

ABOUT THE POP-UP POSITIVITY TOUR
This tour was inspired by Blazian’s national news feature on Headline News Network (HLN) – Moment of Sunshine with Robin Meade a few weeks ago, where the teen brothers noticed a young woman walking to a bus stop, wearing shoes that were literally “falling apart”.

They stopped their vehicle to ask her shoe size, and in a span of 15 minutes, they went to the nearest shoe store, bought a pair of shoes and raced back to the bus stop (just in time), as the bus was arriving, and handed her the shoes as she boarded the bus.

It was then, they decided they would be the catalyst to push young people to do “something” – “anything” positive (no matter how big or small) over the summer….and the tour was formed!

ABOUT BLAZIAN
Blazian is an American hip-pop group comprised of brothers, Charlie Walker III (CJ), and Darius Walker (DJ). Natives of Atlanta, GA, these young, gifted entertainers are truly on the rise. They have performed on some of the biggest teen concerts in the country and alongside many of today’s hottest talents. They have recently released their new single and are quickly building a global fan base both on and offline.

Blazian prides themselves on uniting cultures and promoting positivity to the masses. They are a unique gift to today’s saturated industry and with their talent, passion, and energy they will rise above the noise to be leaders of this new generation in entertainment.

Follow Blazian Online Everywhere @WeBlazian

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Blazian at Sparkles June2017

Why Some Record Labels Fail, While Others Succeed?

What I Learned Working with a Label That Failed

 

In early 2015, I was invited to join a “dream team” of music industry professionals.

This team consisted of a former VP of a major record label, a manager from a “major” indie artist, as well as an assembly of top-notch graphic designers, publicists and assistants. Our mission was to work with a brand new record label and assist them in acquiring a larger fanbase and overall develop their brand.

From the surface we succeeded: Social media numbers skyrocketed, we garnered healthy press coverage, and we even had two of their artist chart on radio. Not to mention, we had some official showcases, as well some fun opening spots.

However, despite this, the label ended up folding. Some of their (very talented) roster still operates with them, but what I assume is just until their contracts expire, or they recoup their recording costs.

So, how did this happen? They had the talent, a good team, and not to mention the capital, so… what happened? And more importantly, what can artists, labels and managers learn from this?

 

Baby Steps

The New Artists Were Treated Like Vets.

Their artists were talented, very talented. One issue I found was that the label wanted myself and my team to completely take over the artist’s social media channels. However, they weren’t ready developmentally for a team to just completely take over their brand and social media.

Come to think of it, even my major artist clients don’t have a team handling their social completely. You might have someone schedule certain portions of content or maybe offer an extra set of hands during a tour, but for the most part, as an artist, you need to showcase your brand online.

Especially when that brand is still being developed.

This led to the artists feeling as if the label wasn’t “portraying their brand” appropriately online. They felt as if tweets went out in a tone that wasn’t “their voice”. And well, yeah — because it wasn’t their voice. Their brand was still too green for someone else to handle it.

These guys were still finding their voice as an artist, so they needed to tweet, do videos and interact on their own. Because they were still growing.

In today’s digital era, your online footprint — your imagery, your tweets, your ‘gram posts — are just as important as your music. You can have a dope track that’s getting radio play, but if your fans aren’t sharing it online, then it’s going to just fizzle out. You can have a team help you out with this, I recommend it, but handing it off completely to a third party — is a bit dangerous.

But social media really wasn’t the problem…

We did well on social media. The pages grew, and we got some great online traction during releases. However, when an artist doesn’t feel as if they have control of their art — the energy stops. You don’t need this, especially from a young artist. I already spoke on how the artist is the CEO, even with a label. You certainly don’t want “too many chefs in the kitchen” spoiling this. You need to give your artist’s room to grow.

However, let’s also talk about this from a growth standpoint. One of the guys on the “consultant team” was an industry vet of 30+ years or so. He’s also the manager of an artist that’s been the indie king, before indie was practical. He’d often gruff that our artists haven’t “paid their dues” yet.

And while that may seem like something any vet would say to a rookie — it’s actually a valuable piece of insight.

By putting a new artist on a pedestal, you’re selling the artist a lifestyle that might not actually come into fruition. The artist needs to be spending time networking, and remaining active on social media — rather than thinking: “The team will handle it”.

This is a major way to set an artist up for failure — by giving them illusions that they’re on the road to success, when their brand still hasn’t matured.

This was ridiculously summarized one week when we were on the road. The artists went out to a few clubs the night before a key performance. The label’s “A&R” pushed them to go, labeling it as “networking”. But in reality, it was just an excuse for them to stay out all night. Did they network? Maybe. But I do know that the only thing to come from their “network outing” was two artists oversleeping, with hoarse voices the day of their major showcase.

Another quick observation was the naivety that a track was going to go viral on it’s own — or the fact that we’d have thousands of pre-orders for these relatively known artists.  Sure, the artist is good — and might be popping in your backyard, but we have to ensure that we have a working platform before we can expect to see massive results and brand awareness.

 

Wheels.

We Confused Movement with Progress

I want to be very clear about the dynamic of this partnership, and the dynamic of any client-agency relationship. It’s your duty to tell your client what their doing a bad idea. In this circumstance, the CEO of the label hired us because he was rather green when it came to the music industry.

However, the CEO would often go against our advice, a lot of this centered around pay-for-play.

The CEO wanted to ensure the artists saw movement, he wanted his artists satisfied because they were playing “during” SXSW, they were being posted on blogs, or they were opening for acts. While this is true, you need to keep your artists happy with movement, that movement isn’t always progress.

We bought onto gigs, which was a great experience for the artist — but didn’t really result in new fans or even moved merch. Especially when the line-up was jam packed with other folks who paid to play.

We paid to get onto blogs, which the artist thought was cool, but at the end of the day,they were mid-tier and some top blogs, who rarely even shared the article on their social outlets. It was found on the website sure — but it wasn’t on the main page, or on their social media. So, who saw it? Aside from the fans we shared it with.

And yes, we boosted on social and more, but the key to PR is to make connections with journalists, not pay to be on a blog that isn’t even promoting their own article.

Similarly, why spend money on paying for shows, when you could be spending time pitching talent buyers and building relationships with venues. Or even spending time genuinely connecting with other bands, so those other artists invite you on as an open act. Organically. Without paying a dime.

One thing we did well was radio. Our guys were great on the microphone, and we had them on the road, going to stations spinning their work to do interviews. This led to more airplay, and it even led to a few music festival opportunities. Did it cost money to send them across the country doing press? Yes. But did it result in more authentic reach? Yep.

Our radio campaign was a great example of using leverage, to further a message. While, all of the paid work, was us moving without progression.

I guess I should also note that we likely relied too heavily on a radio promoter. After some time, we should have stopped outsourcing it, and brought the radio promotion in-house. Since we were already making connections, and we already sunk a pretty penny into the artists radio campaigns. This could have simply been us paying too much for a promoter, rather than a bad marketing move.

Watching a promising label sink a lot of money into pay-for-play, and pay-for-post opportunities, to the point that they were hurting financially, is why I’m such a vocal component of authentic PR and booking strategies.

However, we wanted to move. The wheels were spinning, but we weren’t really going anywhere.

The key here is leverage.

If you get a blog post, that blog post better be posted on the outlet’s social media, and be a genuine write-up, not just a copy and paste.

If you open up for an artist, there needs to be good marketing via the venue, and you need to ensure you’ll have a chance to connect with fans and move merch.

Sure, you can move, but you have to grow and progress as well. Simple movement isn’t enough, you need to go somewhere. Not just turn your wheels.

In this case, the CEO was paying big money to move our wheels — which later led to the label’s demise.

Cookie Cutter

We Tried Using a Cookie Cutter Approach

The label had four prominent artists: One was an R&B act, two were rappers , and lastly, the label had an indie rock group, to round things out.

While the label kept pushing to use one marketing approach for all artists, you simply cannot use a “copy/paste” view when looking at these three artists. For instance, one could think you can lump the R&B artists and two rappers into one category, however, not so much.

The R&B artist was young and still really appealed to the 13-17 year old demographic. Whereas the two rappers had lyrical content that mainly dealt with sex, drugs and partying.

But even the two rappers were incredibly different — one was more of a lyricist, who had a very “mainstream” vibe to him. While the other had more of a rough image, a focus on production and had lyrical content that was a bit more “in your face” than the other rapper.

Despite having these very different artists, the label insisted they be booked at the same showcases, which, weren’t too bad. Until you remember, oh damn, they had an indie rock band, too!

Yes, the indie rock group was scheduled to play at a hip hop showcase in Austin, Texas.

That’s the thing, the team had in-depth experience surrounding hip hop, and the indie rock group suffered from it. The  group was also incredibly talented, and actually had the most fan interaction on the label. They also (since there was 4 of them) seemed to take a lot of marketing initiative on their own.

The booking issue also came to a head when they were trying to book the rapper, who had a radio single explicit about sex, to play a high school tour. Because it worked for the R&B singer. Luckily, we convinced them to not go that route.

But the differences are more nuanced than just booking decisions. For instance, even if the two rappers were both “hip hop artists” things such as radio stations, press outlets, and even advertising keywords were going to change.

 

Contracts

The Artists Needed Development, Not Contracts.

I’m not a legal expert, and I tend to refer my clients to folks that know more about contracts than I do. However, I do know that an artist shouldn’t have to be held to ridiculously high recoup costs, when there isn’t really a platform yet.

The label seemed to have these artists under agreements that some may consider standard industry fare. However, the label was brand new!

The label/artist relationship is symbiotic. For the artist to make money, the artist has to recoup the money that the label invested. So if the label spends 15K on recording, then the artist won’t see any money until they recoup that 15K. That’s on both of the label and artist to work towards.

However, the label wasn’t at a place in which they had a system to make money, similarly, the artists weren’t at a place where they had popping fan bases who were willing to consistently buy an artist’s product. Sure, this seems a bit a Chicken-Egg situation, however, these artists didn’t need record label – bank loans, they needed to be taught how to carry themselves as artists. And instead of the label depending on the artists to really bring in revenue (miraculously), they needed to spend more time developing their booking, licensing and sales systems before signing various artists.

My team didn’t deal with the artist’s contracts, and more tried to get the label to a place in which they were profiting. However, this showed a naivety that exists in a lot of young labels. Folks think “if they build it, it’ll come” but… no, you have to build it well. You need a solid foundation and solid revenue strategy before signing on multiple artists.

As consultants, as labels, as managers, as publicists — we forget this simple fact that bares repeating:

We are assisting artists in promoting their creation. We are helping an artist bring light to their art.

There’s nothing sexy or cool about this — actually, it’s a lot of pressure. You’re ensuring that you are framing, protecting and promoting an artist’s vision. That’s heavy. Before you delve into any artist relationship, you need to ensure you are properly equipped to give them the spotlight that they deserve.

 

Concluding This.

The above four “reasons” were integral in this label failing, but at the end of the day — the major reason we failed was capital. If we were to have taken our time between each artist, we might still be trucking along on this. But we spent a lot of money turning wheels, and promoting our acts very quickly and rapidly.

Also, there was just a lot of foundational issues that still needed to be addressed and repaired. Those restorations could’ve taken quite some time.

But at the end of the day, despite the label folding, this was one of the most memorable projects I have had the privilege of working on. The “dream team” of consultants have gone on to do many successful and fun projects, and the guys at the label I still have an incredible amount of respect for. Not to mention these artists are still incredible musicians, and I’m sure they’ll find ways to succeed and prosper very soon.

 

Thanks @wtylerallen for this insight…..

As a music marketing strategist, Tyler Allen works with an extensive array of artists, labels, music tech, and music retail entities. Tyler began his music industry career with Sony Music Entertainment and RED Distribution, as well as the advertising industry. He is dedicated to giving veteran artists the tools to preserve their legacy, and new artists the tools to begin theirs (as well as everything in between). Learn more at wtylerconsulting.com.

Got Check? Indie Artist GET PAID!

TuneCore Paid $36 Million To Indie Musicians In First 3 Months Of 2015

tunecore logoEarlier this month, Believe Digital acquired flat fee D.I.Y. digital music distributor TuneCore, in a move that reshuffled the indie music distribution deck. Today, Tunecore shared its most recent payouts to indie artists.

image from www.hypebot.comTuneCore announced today that it paid $36 million to artists in the first three months of 2015. That’s a a 5% increase versus the same three months last year.  The earnings represent income from 2.8 billion downloads and streams.

Since 2006, TuneCore Artists have earned over $541 million from over 15.2 billion downloads and streams, according to the company.

International Growth

Growth in international music consumption is helping to drive income for more independent musicians.  Emerging markets including Chile, Guatemala, Hong Kong, Poland and Turkey experienced growth, seeing 134%, 70%, 48%, 68% and 180% increases respectively.

TuneCore now serves music to 150+ digital music partners; and in Q1 added Play.me (Italy) and Zvooq (Russia and surrounding countries).

Publishing

Artists using TuneCore Music Publishing Administration have now registers over 300,000 compositions – a 20% increase (Q1 2015 vs. Q1 2014).  Recent high-profile placements include: HBO’s hit series Girls, cable series Better Call Saul and the feature film Furious 7.

The company produced this infographic to illustrate quarterly growth:

image from www.tunecore.com

Story Appears via @hypebot

Client News: It’s Time You Meet David Correy…..

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INTERNATIONAL RECORDING ARTIST “DAVID CORREY” SIGNS TO 50/50 MUSIC GROUP

Former X Factor Finalist Partners With New Management Team And Releases Special Tribute Song To Honor Adoptive Mother On the One-Year Anniversary of Her Passing

(ATLANTA, GA – March 26, 2015) On February 17th, 2015, Brazilian-American singer David Correy signed to 50/50 Music Group, a multi-faceted music management, publishing and consulting firm headquartered in Atlanta, GA. For years, he pursued his music career on his own until finally deciding on a management company that could facilitate the necessary steps in the forward progression of his career. As a diversely talented singer, Correy delivers soulful music through a myriad of well-blended musical styles. He is a visionary that is always expanding his horizons in the landscape of today’s music. By signing with 50/50 Music Group, Correy has made it clear that he wants to elevate his career to new heights.

Originally featured on the 2nd season of X-Factor in 2012, David Correy has succeeded in making a name for himself in the industry. Born in Brazil, he was adopted at an early age and grew up in Riva, Maryland. He stole the heart of the world by searching for his birth mother while a contestant on the show. Unfortunately, after connecting with his birth mother, tragedy hit close to home with the death of his foster mother.

Friday, March 27th, 2015 marks the one-year anniversary of Correy’s foster mother’s passing. As a tribute to her, Correy has released the song, “Fighter”, an emotional and uplifting musical piece that displays the love and appreciation he holds for the mother who raised him. This song, along with his other recent material, has garnered several hundred thousand views, likes and listens, signaling Correy’s genuine connection to his fans.

When referring to his music, Correy contributes much of his success to being able to incorporate diversity into his music as a multi-lingual artist. He believes that music can bridge the gap between different people and it has enabled him to stretch his perspective about music and widen its universal appeal across all cultures.

David Correy has tirelessly pursued his passion for music and is currently planning the release of a new single and video. He has already toured the world and because of his growing popularity and global sound, he was recently showcased as an Ambassador and Official Anthem Singer for his song, The World Is Ours’, Coca-Cola’s 2014 World’s Anthem for the FIFA World Cup.

For up-to-date information on David Correy, please connect with him via: Twitter -@DavidCorrey,  IG – DavidCorrey,      Youtube – DavidCorreyMusic, Facebook – DavidCorreyURR

Wish Creative Media Welcomes David Correy to the Family!

Get to Know David Correy:

Performing “I AM” on The Today Show: 

A NEW STAR EMERGES….

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LEXXI BANX

Eagerly entering the music scene with her melodious tone, animated cut throat lyrics and often with her violin in tow…Lexxi is in a class by herself!

Singer, Rapper, Classical Violinist, Dancer, & Actress… Lexxi Banx knows what it means to work with dedication, determination, and discipline. Those who know her define her as an overcomer and survivor. Beginning at age eight when she picked up her first violin, then age ten when she wrote her first lyrics and at 16 composed her first score  – this child prodigy has been striking beautiful chords, vocalizing unforgettable melodies, and perfecting her freestyle rap skills every since….

Originally from Spartanburg, South Carolina, Lexxi Banx is a unique quadruple threat in the entertainment industry…and her talents will soon reach way beyond her current home base of Atlanta GA.

For Your Hip Hop, EDM and R&B Listening Pleasure…

Welcome to Lexxi’s World!

What SONG Earned the Most Royalties 1st Quarter 2014?

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Yep! That’s right….

The song that earned the most royalties in the quarter was Katy Perry’s “Dark Horse (feat. Juicy J).” Billboard estimates the song produced $883,000 from U.S. Radio performance and mechanical royalties. Ryan Tedder was the top writer for the second quarter in a row.  Billboard estimates that his credits for five songs — “Counting Stars,” by his band OneRepublic, Ellie Goulding’s “Burn”, Demi Lovato’s “Neon Lights, Maroon 5’s “Love Somebody”, and the Fray’s “Love Don’t Die” — generated $881,000 revenue in mechanical royalties from U.S. album sales and track downloads, and performance royalties from U.S. radio airplay in the first quarter. Billboard estimates he earned $582,000 that in the previous quarter from the three Top 100 radio songs he had a hand in writing.

Want to know what company ranked #1 for 2014 1st Quarter Royalties?

Sure you do…. Click Here

FYI all of you Music Artists….the money is in writing/publishing! So get to the business….

Annnnnnd We’re Back!

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Please excuse our brief hiatus from industry news, client updates, event reviews and all that other stuff…

Wish Creative has taken on the challenge of re-focusing our brand and clientele as the needs of our community and our industry has evolved in the past few years.

We are excited to bring you what we are working on and who we are working with…and  truly appreciate your patience and support….Now let’s get to the business!!

 

Kimberly Jo