ARTIST MARKETING…Follow the Leaders

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Not Really Sure How to Market Yourself or Your Project – Ok, Let’s Discuss.

If You’re Trying to Decide Which Strategies to Use, the Answer is EASY!

ALL OF THEM! 

1. Know your brand

Before you can market your band, you need to have your brand in place.

What’s unique about your act? Which aspects of your story are the most compelling and set you apart from every other band out there? How will you present yourself consistently — from your onstage look, to your social media tone, to your logo and color schemes and photos?

Once you’ve honed your brand, the specifics of your band marketing strategies and fan communication will flow from there.

2. Use your email newsletter

Your email list is an incredibly valuable direct line to your most dedicated fans. You have no control over Facebook’s ever-changing News Feed algorithm, but you can always use your newsletter to reach the people who want to hear from you the most. Plus, email is by far the most effective way to sell your music, tickets, and merchandise.

3. Have a website

Investing in a great band website is one of the most important things you can do to maximize your marketing efforts. No matter how many newsletters you send out or how many Facebook ads you run, a poorly designed, outdated website — or no website at all — will hurt your credibility and give off the impression that you’re not serious about your music.

When done right, your band website acts as the central hub for everything. You have full control over the user experience and the data, and you can sell your music and merchandise direct-to-fan.

4. Use social media

Managing several different social media pages can quickly get overwhelming, so the key is to focus on where your fans (and potential new fans) are most active. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are all great places to start, but you should also explore platforms like YouTube, Snapchat, and even Pinterest, and see if it makes sense to put the effort into building a following there.

5. Focus on streaming

While we still have a long way to go before the average artist can realistically earn a living from streaming revenue, there’s no arguing that services like Spotify and Apple Music have become the new go-to for music fans to discover bands. These days, having your song included in a curated Spotify playlist can be just as effective (if not more) than traditional press coverage.

If you don’t already have your music on all of the major streaming platforms, sign up with a digital distribution company like TuneCore, and get your releases up there. The setup process is easy, and there’s really no downside!

6. Leverage the power of YouTube

Video is a powerful medium for band marketing. By adding a visual layer to your artistry, you’re reinforcing your brand while allowing fans to connect with your music in a deeper way.

Youtube is one of the first places people search when they’re trying to find a specific song, so make sure you upload all of your original music and official music videos to your band’s channel. You might also want to consider regularly posting unique cover videos, vlogs, live performances, or interviews so that you show up more often in search results and make yourself more accessible to potential fans.

7. Perform Live….Everywhere!

Performing live is one of the best ways to get new fans and market your band. Start by focusing on your local scene, and don’t hesitate to play charity events, fundraisers, or private events in between your music venue/bar gigs. Once you’ve built up a strong local following, you can turn your attention to regional weekend tours and music festival gigs, mix it up with multiple genre festivals to gain even more exposure.

8. Build Relationships and Get Reviews.

Getting publicity for yourself or band is all about relationships, but you shouldn’t wait until you can finally afford a music publicist to start working on your strategy. Keep a running list of any local or independent music blogs that have covered bands similar to yours, and make a note of their contact info and any pitch requirements listed on the website.

Even if you only hear back from a couple of small blogs at first, you can use those initial reviews to build momentum and buzz, and eventually work your way up to getting covered by bigger publications with a wider reach. Plus, you never know where those small bloggers will end up in a couple of years, so make sure you maintain those relationships.

9. Create band merchandise

Let your diehard fans do the marketing for you by donning a T-shirt with your band logo on it!

Besides the usual suspects like clothing, stickers, and posters, there are thousands of creative items you can offer your fans — think phone cases, flasks, or even handwritten lyric sheets. Just make sure that whatever merchandise you create is aligned with your brand, and something that your fans would actually be excited to purchase.

10. Run contests

Running an occasional contest or giveaway is a great band marketing idea — you benefit from the exposure, and lucky fans of yours get something for free from a band they love.

You could do something as simple as a social media ticket giveaway for your next show, or as involved as a VIP listening party or scavenger hunt around your city. Whatever you do, try to make it fun and exciting so that people are incentivized to spread the word on your behalf.

11. Don’t forget radio

Radio might not be your first thought when you’re brainstorming band marketing strategies, but targeting independent and college radio stations can be a very effective way to promote your music.

If you manage to grab a program director’s attention, you’ll be able to tap into a new audience that trusts and enjoys their music curation.

12. Look into sponsorships and partnerships

We’re not talking about some huge, unattainable contract with a major international brand — you can partner with local businesses and work out a deal that’s simple, authentic, and mutually beneficial.

Do some research on companies that are already working with bands similar to where you are in your music career. Take note of what both parties put into and get out of the arrangement, and think through what sorts of things you could offer and would benefit from.

As an example, you could strike up a collaboration with a local graphic design firm. They create a unique, limited-edition merch item for your band to sell at your next show, and in return, you give them a cut of the profits and help promote them on your website and social media pages.

13. Engage your fans

As you’ve read through these strategies, you’ve probably gathered by this point that it all really boils down to this: build genuine relationships that turn your casual fans into devoted superfans, and they’ll supplement all of your efforts with the most powerful marketing of all — word of mouth. It obviously requires consistent hard work to engage and nurture your fans, but those superfans are the key to building a legitimate, long-lasting music career.

14. Build Your Team…Don’t Give Up

This is a hard business, surround yourself with positivity and people that will motivate you when you get discouraged! Trust me, it will! But Don’t Give Up!

Follow @1kimberlyjo on IG for some inspiration

Thanks Lisa Occhino for the words of wisdom!

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ROD DA GOD – Atlanta’s Hottest New Hip Hop Artist Releases Video for His Debut Single “FairyTale”

FairyTale Promo Pic

Atlanta GA’s next rising star, 19 yr. old, 6’3, hip hop artist, Jerrod Thompson aka “Rod Da God”, blazes into the industry with a hit record, an authentically fast-building fan base, and the creative talent to propel him into superstardom through music and acting.

Today, he releases the debut video for his 1st single – “Fairytale” which is already in rotation at radio stations across the country and has sparked social media madness as thousands of teenage girls are participating in Rod Da God’s #FairyTaleDayChallenge on Instagram.

With millions of YouTube lyric video views and SoundCloud plays, hundreds of thousands IG and Twitter likes, and an increasing number of radio requests, performances and interviews under his belt – Rod Da God is already creating a solid foundation and industry/fan connection in the crowded “new artist market”.

His music and style are influenced by a wide-range of artists such as Drake, L.L. Cool J, and Will Smith. “I don’t have to try and fit in and look cool, I’m just myself and everyone loves me for it”, says the 6’3 artist and actor (he is also a basketball star, winning the 2016 State Championship at Westlake High School in Atlanta GA).

Fun, young and witty, Rod Da God, has affectionately been crowned the #FreshPrinceofATL, and is hot off the High School “Juice Tour” where young fans crowded the stage, sang along to “Fairytale”, took pictures and got autographs from Atlanta’s hottest new hip hop artist. He now has a full schedule of appearances and performances in Albany GA, Atlanta GA, Macon GA, Nashville TN, Chicago IL, The Carolinas, several Florida markets and more.

Check out Rod Da God’s tour performance – HERE

“Right now, I’m focused on Rod Da God’s movement, we are in the studio creating weekly, this kid is special,” says legendary and Grammy-winning producer DJ Toomp.

Rod Da God’s passion and enduring work ethic have put his career on the fast track. With major plans in development, strategically positioned to follow up and support his fast-moving single, he remains steadfast in expanding his talents, building his fan base and becoming what the industry is missing – authenticity in art…Visit the links below to Meet ROD DA GOD.

All eyes are on this rising star, you can check out the debut video right HERE (Dirty) or HERE (Clean)

Connect with Rod Da God on social media – IG and Twitter @RoddaGoddd

Bonus: Listen to Rod Da God’s next release “Conversation” produced by DJ Toomp HERE

 

For all Media Inquiries:

Contact – Kimberly Jo Wilson at WishCreativeMedia@gmail.com

For Booking and Management:

Contact Sheridan “Hotel” Hardwick PH – 404.454.8443 or Email – LBMG2008@gmail.com 

 

 

 

Why Is It So Hard To Get Paid In the Music Industry?

Guest Post: Why Getting Paid In The Music Industry Is So Complicated, And How It Can Be Better

Guest Post: Why Getting Paid In The Music Industry Is So Complicated, And How It Can Be Better

 

David Balto is a lawyer and consumer advocate based in Washington, D.C., who previously served as the policy director of the Federal Trade Commission.

In Recording Academy CEO Neil Portnow’s recent op-ed called The Penny Paradox, he asked, “Isn’t a song worth more than a penny?” The problem, as outlined by Portnow, is that artists aren’t being paid enough for their work. However, this is a gross oversimplification of a more complicated issue of payment in the music industry. An issue that, unfortunately, consumers (and artists) are caught in the middle of as powerful and less powerful interests fight over how to divide payments amongst themselves.

When Portnow is talking about a song being worth a penny he is, of course, not talking about someone being able to own a song for an actual penny. He is talking about the cost per listen of a single license. An interactive music streamer like Spotify needs two licenses to serve a single song to a customer, and three licenses under certain circumstances. When a consumer buys a song, they make one payment and own it forever. Streaming a song is not ownership, and royalties must be paid for each listen.

This leads to a complex picture of how artists earn money. They can get one payment from a fan that buys their album or a recurring payment as a fan continues to play their songs on a streaming service. Artists can also get paid both ways from a single fan — a correlation between internet radio “spins” and sales were found in 2014.

It gets even more complicated. Artists own different copyrights and get paid differently based on whether they wrote the song and/or recorded the song. They deal with different middlemen and the licensing is handled through different organizations: SoundExchange for sound recording rights, a publishing rights organization like ASCAP or BMI for the performance right and individual publishers for each song’s mechanical rights.

ASCAP and BMI are currently regulated through agreements made with the Department of Justice that are regulated by federal courts which stress fairness and transparency. These agreements were necessary because collective bargaining — like that done through ASCAP and BMI — is illegal under antitrust laws, but all parties considered it necessary to have a collective bargaining system to cut down contracting costs in a complex industry. In other words, it’s a narrow exception to the general rules of a competitive market.

And now it’s getting even more complicated. Publishers, some of which have market power, are lobbying the DOJ to make changes in the consent decrees to allow them to withhold music from radio, venues and streaming services. These changes would let publishers jump out of ASCAP and BMI when it suits them. So much for fairness and non-discrimination. And so much for fair prices for consumers.

Publishers will also be able to agree amongst themselves not to license a performance right unless all owners of a copyright assent. This will give even small owners of a copyright complete control, not just over performance rights but over the sound recording as well. If a five percent owner of the performance rights to Justin Bieber’s “Love Yourself” refuses to license, for instance, that not only affects other owners of the performance rights, but also Justin Bieber’s royalty payments for the sound recording. A music user has to license all rights to play a song, and if any fractional owner had veto rights they would be able to control the destiny of the entire song and every sound recording, not just what they own.

This didn’t matter when radio and venues could contract with ASCAP and BMI, each of which has to license to all comers at a fair rate. But in a world where publishers can be in and out of ASCAP and BMI, it suddenly matters a great deal. This has the potential to not only hurt consumers, but also artists who can’t get their song played because an owner of a small piece of it refuses to license. Ultimately, both consumers and artists will lose.

I do not agree with Portnow on the simple solution that payments for songs need to increase. This is the solution before the DOJ right now, and it will likely lead to tremendous harm to consumers and potentially artists (we don’t know how much of that increase, if any, will filter through to them and how much will be pocketed by the powerful publishers). However, I do agree that we can do better and that solutions must come from Congress.

Congress, for example, could set up a one-stop shop for the complete bundle of rights needed to play a song, and all the rights owners could divide those payments among themselves. This would make it easy to agree on a payment that is good for artists while still allowing streaming services to be profitable (important after the Copyright Royalty Board’s rate increase led to the closure of many smaller independent and local services). Congress also has many more options to make sure the most vulnerable parties, consumers, and artists, are protected.

Article Via Billboard.Biz

 

CD Baby: $58M in 2013 Revenue

And WHY aren’t you using CD Baby Anymore…..

CD Baby has shared some behind the scenes stats that also provide a seldom seen view of the vibrancy of independent and D.I.Y. music.

The company currently distributes 5 million digital tracks on behalf of 330,000 artists. In 2013, those artists generated $58 million in revenue, up from $53 million in 2012. This year, 77% of artist revenue came from were digital downloads, 8% from streaming and 15% from physical goods.

Physical good sales stats would not include at direct and at-gig sales and other transactions made outside of CD Baby‘s distribution network.

CDBaby-Infographic_FINAL

via our friends @hypebot

So I ask you again….Why Aren’t You Using CD Baby?

Give Us Feedback……

[Client News] Legalize Loud with Stalley

Tuesday, June 4th the 2nd Installment of the Legalize Loud Series Kicks Off with Maybach Music Member, Stalley, along with ATL’s Own Scotty ATL, Forte Bowie,Translee, Stuey Rock and many more!

Please contact Wish Creative for Media Access!

 
LegalizeLoud2

Who Has the Best Selling Album of the Decade?

Singer/Songwriter - Norah Jones

Singer/Songwriter – Norah Jones

Norah Jones’ breakthrough album Come Away With Me is the best-selling record in America over the past decade, according to a new list compiled by Vh1.

The 2002 release has chalked up sales of 10,797,000 to date – over 700,00 more than second placed Eminem’s The Eminem Show.

Usher’s Confessions is the third bestseller with sales of 9,968,000 and Adele’s 21 is fourth with just over eight million albums sold.

Also making the top 10: 50 Cent’s Get Rich Or Die Tryin’, Fallen by Evanescence, Nickelback’s All The Right Reasons, Carrie Underwood’s Some Hearts and Fearless by Taylor Swift.

Source Magazine Cover Release Event ATL

We were very happy to work with Source Magazine to produce their April/May 2012 Magazine Issue Release Party at the legendary Artist Factory!

 

Thank You to our  Event Hosts Lil Bankhead and Ft. Knox

A BIG SHOUT OUT  to the Artist Factory and the whole Wish Creative team for Makin’ It Happen

 

 

 

 

 

Special Thanks to Ciroc, Akoo Clothing, Redbull, Agirlandherhiphop.com, Monster DJs, and Mirosa Beer

 

Check out a few pics of the event – hopefully we will get the videos up soon!

Juve, Kimberly Jo, Hiriam Hicks, and Teddy Deraj

Gregory Smith, Kimberly Jo, B.Cox

Hamilton Park Members & Jive Artist Issa

Atlanta City Councilman Kwanza Hall & “Do It” Artist Mykko Montanna

The Incredible Angie Stone

Mr. Collipark and Source’s Summer Smith

DJ Kutthroat

Source Magazine May 2012 Cover

OK…people!  Make sure to check out this month’s Source Magazine.  Check back with us for videos of the event’s performances from Planet VI (formerly Rock City), Mykko Montana, Ying Yang and more!